COLORS 90: Football – Thirty-two teams. One golden trophy.

COLORS 90: Football – Thirty-two teams. One golden trophy.

This summer, an elite selection of extraordinary footballers finally comes together to play the most beautiful game on earth in COLORS 90 – Football. In this issue, a mechanical striker winds up to score at the 2014 RoboCup, a Saudi goalie dives for the save on a top secret pitch for women, and players from the streets of Sao Paulo to the fields of Dharamsala break out their bicycle kicks. For the 226 million footballers who play on streets, at school, at work, in jail and everywhere other than under the spotlight, COLORS presents the world’s most popular game as FIFA has never dared show it.

COLORS 89: Moving House – In the past quarter century, the world’s migration rate has doubled. Today, 232 million migrants live abroad, and 90 million more are currently packing their bags. COLORS 89 – Moving House follows their journeys.

COLORS 89: Moving House – In the past quarter century, the world’s migration rate has doubled. Today, 232 million migrants live abroad, and 90 million more are currently packing their bags. COLORS 89 – Moving House follows their journeys.

While Spanish homeowners are setting up house on the streets after getting evicted from their homes, Chinese workers are moving into shipping containers in Shanghai. Indian temple devotees are sacrificing toy airplanes in return for a visa; halfway across the world, Mexican vacationists are voluntarily getting chased by fake US border patrol at a local tourist attraction. We’ve investigated people's motives to move, the borders they cross, the things they carry and the obstacles they surmount. Including a few tips on how to build a temporary shelter and a set of maps to put you on the right path, in case you are looking for one.

COLORS 88: Protest – Over the past three years, people in more than 80 countries across the world have taken to the streets to protest against their governments. But only in 6 of the above countries did governments finally fall.

COLORS 88: Protest – Over the past three years, people in more than 80 countries across the world have taken to the streets to protest against their governments. But only in 6 of the above countries did governments finally fall.

COLORS 88: Protest tells stories of how protests start, spread, triumph, are repressed and sometimes become revolutions. From South Korea's anti-uprising volunteer corps to female drivers in Saudi Arabia; from Mexico's labor rights superheroes to fully-armed guns rights demonstrators in the United States; from the pigs left to roam the main square of Nairobi, Kenya, to Palestinians dressing like blue aliens from Hollywood film Avatar, we've interviewed, photographed, and illustrated popular uprising across the world. Plus, Occupy, Tahir, FEMEN sextremists and a series of illustrated DIY protest techniques and strategies: how to use a mattress as a shield, chain yourself to a tree, and hold your breath until it’s all over.

COLORS 87: Looking at Art – So you want to be an artist?

COLORS 87: Looking at Art – So you want to be an artist?

What distinguishes a conceptual masterpiece from a bit of urban debris? A renowned painter from a commercial designer? Is copying allowed in art, and if so, says who? From a 12 million dollar shark carcass to England's most prolific forger family, from North Korea’s #1 atelier to the fig leaf that hides David’s package. COLORS 87: Looking at Art explores how we teach, buy, sell, and steal art today. *Plus the Switzerland's ultra-secret art vaults and the crime behind the Mona Lisa.

COLORS 86: Making the News – News is something somebody doesn't want printed. All else is advertising.

COLORS 86: Making the News – News is something somebody doesn't want printed. All else is advertising.

In 2011, news of Osama bin Laden’s assassination was broken by a Pakistani IT consultant’s tweet. The next year, a computer algorithm composed nearly 400,000 articles on Little League baseball for small-town newspapers across the United States. Now, print journalism has been declared America’s fastest-shrinking industry, but across Africa, newspaper circulation has risen by more than 30 percent. COLORS 86: Making the News reveals the backstage of contemporary journalism: With stories on drone-wielding paparazzi, terrorist press releases and anti-mafia vigilante television anchors – "Making the News" explores how world events are selected, shaped, and sent to you in time for breakfast.

COLORS 85: Going to Market – A Survival Guide

COLORS 85: Going to Market – A Survival Guide

A bursting bubble, tumbling stocks, bears, bulls and futures for sale. Modern markets are obscure, unpredictable and dangerous places. But they also dictate whether you have access to necessities like toilet paper and water, whether your job will still exist tomorrow and whether you can buy a cup of Columbian light roast on your morning commute or not. To get what you want, you have to navigate the flow of trade and exchange. Sell what you have – your labor, your possessions, your first-born child – and buy what you can. Everyone does it. So how do you? Which markets are you a part of? What are you buying? What are you selling? And at what price?

COLORS 84: Apocalypse – A Survival Guide

COLORS 84: Apocalypse – A Survival Guide

Hit by a meteorite, wiped out by a pandemic, fried in a nuclear holocaust or frozen in another Ice Age: civilization could end in a hundred ways. Yet the relentless onslaught of disaster prophecies leaves you overwhelmed, exhausted and unsure who to believe. You've got Apocalypse Fatigue, but don't give up. The climate is the hottest it's been for 1,000 years, and this century will see temperatures rise five times more than they have already, bringing hurricanes, floods, famine and wildfire. So start preparing: build a bunker, secure your energy supply, stockpile food. When mankind throws itself into the abyss, you need to be ready to climb back out.

COLORS 83: Happiness – A Survival Guide

COLORS 83: Happiness – A Survival Guide

You get it when you win a race and lose it when you get laid off. Governments put it in their policies, preachers in their sermons, writers at the ends of their stories. Scientists say they've found it on the left side of the brain. Pursuing it, Americans spend US$20 billion a year on self-help and antidepressants. But wealth isn't working: people in the West are twice as rich as they were sixty years ago, yet no more satisfied with their lives. Twenty years from now, depression will be the biggest health burden in the world. Joy, euphoria, satisfaction, tranquility, triumph. It comes in many forms. So what makes you happy?